6 Ways that “Boring Forms” Provide Essential Insight into the Pulse of Your Ministry

It can feel like you are inundated with forms. There are so many forms to fill out for every program and the administration of it all can end up feeling overwhelming. So you end up with a stack of forms on your desk that you barely look at except to check that they are filled out and to ensure you are aware of any allergies.

Children's Ministry Paperwork

But I believe that these forms have so much more value. Registration forms and attendance records particularly are valuable tools in Children’s Ministry. These records offer more than compliance with insurance companies and contact information for families.

Here are 6 ways registration forms and attendance records provide essential insight into the pulse of your ministry:

1. Trends in Attendance

Look at attendance records over a quarter and over the whole year. You will notice trends that can help you make decisions about how to plan for the future, when to begin and end programs, and see when there might be significant drops in attendance.

For example, you notice that attendance dramatically drops off of your clubs program after June so that might be valuable information to consider shutting it down for the summer.

2. Ratio of Churched Kids to Unchurched Kids

Registration forms can tell you how many churched kids are attending your programs and how many unchurched kids are attending. This is especially helpful information for outreach and evangelistic programs.

You might notice that your outreach program only has 10% non-churched children and 90% churched children. In this case you need to look at ways of encouraging those kids to invite their friends and of ways of getting the word out in the community.

3. Consistency in Attendance

Attendance records can tell you who attends programs consistently and who doesn’t. Looking at these records will also tell you if a student who has been consistent suddenly drops off.

When reviewing attendance records you may notice that a certain child has been missing from the program. You may want to follow up and find out why.

4. Awareness of Family Schedules

With families busy with so many different activities, it can be difficult to know when to schedule events or programs. Taking a look at your attendance records can help you become more aware of the family schedules in your church.

You may notice that attendance as a whole drops off at a certain point in the year. You may want to do some investigating and find out why. The answers might help you schedule the program to fit the needs of families better.

5. Drop in Specific Program Attendance

It’s valuable to take a look at registration and attendance over a number of years.

You may notice that certain programs that were well-attended in the past have far fewer attending now. This may mean you need to look at changes to the program or the possibility of ending the program if it has run its course.

6. Registrations for Kids Who Don’t Actually Attend

You may notice that you received registration forms for children who are not actually attending the program. You may want to follow up with parents and find out why this is.

As you can see, all that paperwork that you feel inundated with in Children’s Ministry is actually essential. If you take the time to review your records you will find insight into the pulse of your ministry.

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How to Schedule Your Day When It Feels Like You Have Too Much to Do and Not Enough Time

Overworked businessman.There is always something to do in Children’s Ministry. It is easy to feel overwhelmed. But there are a few simple things you can do to schedule your day and help you wrest back control of your time and your responsibilities.

Plan Out Your Day

The last thing you should do at the office before you go home is plan out the next day. What responsibilities do you have; what phone calls do you need to make; what meetings do you have scheduled; what projects do you need to work on.

Taking the time to plan is really important, especially when you feel you don’t have the time. It is all too easy to get caught up in the tyranny of the urgent. But if you take some time to plan your day, your week, your month, and your year, you will find yourself being more productive and less overwhelmed. Don’t feel guilty taking a day or two to plan for the upcoming year. Take 10 minutes on a Friday to plan for the upcoming week. Take 5 minutes at the end of the day to play for the next day. It is time well spent.

Figure Out When You’re the Most Productive and Then Make the Best Use of That Time Slot

My husband has figured out that he is most productive in the mornings and so he has been getting up at 6am to work. His productivity has skyrocketed. If I got up at 6am to work, I would spend hours staring blankly at my computer screen wishing I was still in bed. Everybody’s different, but everybody has a peak productivity period during the day. Figure out when yours is and make the best use of it.

Use your peak productivity period for creative work, for long-term planning, vision casting, and completing projects. Save phone calls, emails, filing, etc. for the rest of your day.

Prioritize Your Tasks

You know what needs to be done in your day and you know when your most productive time is, now prioritize what you need to do. Prioritize what needs to be done during your peak productivity period and prioritize what needs to be done outside of that block of productivity.

Figure out what the most important thing is and do that first. Then move on to the next most important or time-sensitive thing on your list. We can’t always tell how much time it will take to complete certain tasks, so do the most important or time-sensitive tasks first.

 

Plan out your day ahead of time, figure out when you are most productive, and then prioritize your tasks. These three tips will help you to schedule your day.

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