Game Review – Bible Blurt!

It’s Sunday morning and as you walk past a classroom you hear:

The last book of the Bible – Revelation!
The Son of God – Jesus!
A title for a king of Egypt – Pharaoh!

The kids are playing Bible Blurt!

Bible Blurt is a card game that can be played with a large or small group of kids ages 8 and up. Bible Blurt is a fun way to review what the kids have been learning and to have fun together. Bible Blurt is great to play with kids who have grown up in the church and with kids who have never read the Bible before. Unchurched kids will not feel left-out as there are plenty of questions that don’t require Bible knowledge.

Here’s how you play:

The official card game rules state that the object is to collect 10 cards by being the quickest to blurt the answers to 10 definitions. The cards are passed around and a definition is read. The child who blurts the correct answer first gets the card. Play continues until someone has 10 cards.

My husband taught a grades 4-6 class and he introduced this game to his students. He came up with some fun ways to vary the game.

He taught in a theatre-like classroom with stairs so he stood at the top of the stairs. The class stood at the bottom. Anyone who shouted out the correct answer moved up one step.

He also played a team version of the game. He split the class into 2 teams and read out definitions. The team who blurted the answer first got the point.

Bible Blurt is available for purchase on amazon.ca for less than $8. You can also make up definitions yourself and play with your class. You can make it specific to what you have been learning and to the kids in your class.

I recommend Bible Blurt. It’s fun, it’s Biblical, it gets everybody involved and doesn’t leave anybody out.

If you are looking for a fun, inexpensive game to play with your kids, check out Bible Blurt.

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Games Your Kids Will Never Tire of Playing – Hide and Seek

Games Your Kids Will Never Tire of PlayingThis game is a classic! I remember playing it as a kid and I’m sure you do to. I played it for hours and I played many different versions of Hide & Seek.

This game can be played inside or outside. It requires no equipment.

Everybody knows how to play Hide & Seek. I want to give you some fun variations that I have played with kids – proven winners!

Object Hide & Seek

I play this version a lot with younger children and in classroom situations as a way of highlighting the theme.

In this version of hide & seek, the chosen player hides a specific object – I’ve used a cross, a doll, a bean bag, and a toy car. Choose any object you want. While the chosen player is hiding the object, the rest of the class hides their eyes and counts out loud. When they get to the designated number, they begin hunting for the hidden object. The player that finds it gets to hide it during the next round.

Hide & Seek in the Dark

In this game, we played the regular rules for hide & seek with the added fun of turning the lights off and giving the seeker a flashlight.

Kids absolutely love playing this game in the dark! It was requested almost on a weekly basis when I led a mid-week club program. We used sometimes all of the church building and sometimes I limited it to one floor. We played with the lights off and the seeker had a flashlight. Of course all leaders had flashlights as well for safety. I also made a rule that the stairs were lit – and I stationed a leader at the stairs to ensure there was light to safely use the stairs.

Sardines

This is a great version of hide & seek. In this game, one person hides and everyone goes to look for that person. However, when you find them, you don’t call it, you hide with them. Everybody hides in the same spot together, hence the name sardines. Everyone gets packed in together! The last person to find the hiding spot hides first in the next round.

I have also played sardines in the dark – but this is not for the feint of heart!

Reasons Why I Love this Game:

  1. All children play at the same time. No one is left out.
  2. It is easy to learn and simple to play.
  3. It is extremely versatile – it can be played almost anywhere, requires minimal or no equipment, and can be played with almost any number of children.
  4. I love the creative places kids will choose to hide and the creative ways kids will try to find the hiders.

Have fun!

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Activity and Game Ideas to Teach the Books of the Bible

In my post Teaching Bible Skills – Finding Books of the Bible, I said that I would give you some ideas for activities and games that will encourage kids to learn the books of the Bible and become familiar with the order of books in the Bible.

Here are some of my favorite activity and game ideas:

1. Games With Popsicle Sticks

Write the books of the Bible on popsicle sticks, one on each.

Pile them on the table and tell your class that they have 1 minute to find as many New Testament (or Old Testament) books as they can.

Separate New Testament from Old Testament and have your class put the popsicle sticks in order.

Have a relay. Pile the popsicle sticks on the floor and line the kids up on the other side of the room. Have them race to put the popsicle sticks in order; or find just New (or Old) Testament books and then put them in order. You can also have them looking for boos from certain sections – Pentateuch, History, Epistles, Poetry. Depending on the skill level of your class, you can let the kids use their Bible’s table of contents.

Hide & Seek – let a couple of kids hide some popsicle sticks around the classroom and then have the rest of the class find and put in order.

2. Bible Bingo

This is a fun activity that kids love!

For younger kids (Gr. 1-3)

Print enough copies of the blank Bible Bingo template (pictured at the right) for your class and fill each in with books from the Bible ahead of time. (Make sure each child’s game sheet a little different). You can focus on Old Testament or New Testament or the whole Bible. Make a master copy so that you don’t have to fill in new templates each time you want to play. You can also print a filled-in Bible Bingo template. You can play with bingo dabbers, highlighters, or markers.

Pass out to your class and explain how to play. Tell them that you will call out a book of the Bible – if you are focusing on a certain part of the Bible, make that clear at the beginning. If they have that book on their bingo sheet, highlight it. When they have 5 in a row, tell them to call bingo.

Use your Bible when you play this game. Even if you don’t need to refer to the table of contents, it is good for the kids to see you with the Bible. It helps them make the connection that these book titles (some are unusual and strange) are books from the Bible.

For older kids (Gr. 4-6)

Print enough copies of the blank Bible Bingo template for your class. Gather bingo dabbers, highlighters, or markers.

Pass out the Bible Bingo sheets to your class and explain how to play. Tell them to use their Bible’s table of contents and fill in the bingo sheet. Let them know if you are focusing on Old Testament or New Testament. Tell them that you will call out a book of the Bible. If they have that book on their bingo sheet, highlight it. When they have 5 in a row, tell them to call bingo.

Use your Bible when you play this game. Even if you don’t need to refer to the table of contents, it is good for the kids to see you with the Bible. It helps them make the connection that these book titles (some are unusual and strange) are books from the Bible.

Variation

Here is a Bible Bingo game that adds in the challenge of knowing the divisions of the books. Print enough copies of the blank or filled-in Bible Bingo template for your class. Also print a copy of the Bible Bingo Leader Strips. You may want to print these on card stock and/or laminate them so they last longer.

Pass out Bible Bingo game sheets to your class. Put the leader strips in a basket or just in a pile on the table. Tell the kids that you will choose and read a strip. They can highlight a match on their Bible Bingo sheet. Explain, “If I say ‘Gospels & Acts,’ they you need to look for Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and Acts. Those are the books in the Gospels and Acts part of the Bible.”

For a younger class or in order to play a shorter game, you may make a rule that kids can highlight any matches on their sheet to the clue you called out. For an older class or to play a longer game, you may make the rule that kids can only highlight one match to the clue you called out. This rules allows the kids to use some strategy during the game.

So, for example, if you are playing by the first rule, if you call ‘Minor Prophets’ kids can highlight any of the Minor Prophets on their Bible Bingo sheet – Malachi, Haggai, Jonah, etc. If you are playing by the second set of rules, they would have to chose one of those options.

This is a fun way to get kids interacting with the books of the Bible and putting them in context by using the divisions as well.

 

3. Old & New Testament Game

Attach the Old & New Testament signs (print in color or print in black and white) to opposite walls of your classroom or play area. Have the children stand in the middle. Call out a book of the Bible and have the children run to the sign of the testament they think it’s in. This game can be played for points or not; if you want to make it a little more competitive for older kids, you could make it an elimination game if they get it wrong.

Using index cards, print one book of the Bible on each card. Put them in a pile on the floor in the middle of the play area. Attach the Old & New Testament signs to opposite walls of your classroom or play area. Tell the kids, when you say “go” they should grab a card and take it to its correct location. All kids play at once. The goal is to see how fast the class can divide the cards into their correct testaments.

4. Books of the Bible Poster Game

Print off a copy of the books of the Bible strips onto cardstock. Laminate if desired. Cut out and add magnets, tape, sticky tac, paper clips or Velcro to the back of each book. Using a poster board, title it “Books of the Bible.” Add sub-titles, “Old Testament” and “New Testament.” Add numbers 1-66, separating the Old and New Testaments. For a variation, make a poster for Old Testament and a poster for New Testament. For an added challenge add the divisions of the Bible. An option would be to make two identical sets of whichever variation you are using for team play.

Attach the poster to the wall or put it flat on the floor. Lay the books of the Bible strips on the floor. Line the kids up. On go, the player picks up a book and races to the poster and places it wherever they believe it goes. The player returns to the start line and tags off the next player. They take their turn, playing as before. In addition, if a player believes a book placed previously is incorrect, he or she may change it. Play continues until all the books are placed correctly.

Playing in teams and racing to be the first team to place all the answers correctly increases the fun!

Note: You can adjust this game to the skill level of your class. Put some books on the poster ahead of time to give the kids a jump start. If you want to give your class a serious challenge, leave the poster blank.

Note: These pictures are examples of what the posters can look like (The New Testament poster is missing number 19 which should be with General Epistles). The actual posters should be bigger (poster paper size). Have fun making these posters or even better make it a class activity to make posters for Bible games!

For more ideas visit the books of the Bible free resources page.

 

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Games Your Kids Will Never Tire of Playing – Sleeping Pirates

Games Your Kids Will Never Tire of PlayingI love this game! More importantly, kids love this game!

This is a great game to play after more active games or when you want to encourage the kids to start quieting down.

I call this game sleeping pirates, but it could be anything – hedgehogs, cowboys, astronauts, lions, whatever.

This game can be played inside or outside. It requires no equipment.

Here’s How to Play:

In this game, all of the children (except one or two captains) lie down on the floor in sleeping positions. Once they are settled, they are not allowed to move. The captains walk through the room and try to make the sleeping pirates move by making them laugh, telling them jokes, and so on. The captains are not allowed to touch the sleeping pirates. Once the pirates have moved, they get up and join the captains.

Reasons Why I Love this Game:

  1. All children play at the same time. No one is left out.
  2. It is easy to learn and simple to play.
  3. It is extremely versatile – it can be played almost anywhere, requires no equipment, and can be played with almost any number of children.
  4. It is a great way to transition from game time to other activities.
  5. I love the creative way kids will choose to “sleep” and the creative ways kids will choose to try make the other players move.
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Don’t miss the opportunity to share the gospel with kids this Easter!

Here are 4 tips for sharing the gospel with kids during Easter:

1. Be intentional about weaving the gospel into the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection

When you tell the story of Jesus death and resurrection to the children in your ministry, include the gospel. Children will not understand why Jesus had to die if we don’t tell them about God’s holiness and people’s sinfulness and Jesus’ atoning sacrifice. When we share the truth of the gospel, we give the kids something to really celebrate Easter morning.

2. Redeem crafts and games

I recently did a craft with my class of preschoolers. The original instructions were to color and glue two popsicle sticks together to make a cross. Stand it in some modeling clay and add a swath of red felt and some flowers at the base. I realized that I wouldn’t be able to tell the kids what the red felt was supposed to be, so I decided not to add it at all. Instead, I printed off small rectangles of card stock that read, “Jesus is our Mighty Savior!” As we were making the craft, we focused on what it means that Jesus is our Savior. Now, when the kids look at their cross crafts, they will hopefully be reminded that Jesus is a mighty Savior.

As you are planning crafts and games to play, take time to think about what the game or craft focuses on. Don’t be afraid to change or refine them to highlight a gospel theme. Redeem the craft or game you are playing by using the opportunity to share the gospel.

3. Use the symbols of Easter

It’s important not to make assumptions about what children understand. Especially when it comes to symbols, it’s important to explain what they mean to children. The cross is probably the biggest symbol of Easter. Children will recognize a cross having seen it in churches, on necklaces, etc, but it is unlikely that children will understand what it symbolizes. Explain simply that a cross helps us to remember that Jesus is our Savior. When you explain what it means that Jesus is our Savior, you are sharing the gospel. Tell children that when we see a cross, it helps us remember that Jesus died to take away our sins. Jesus saved us from our sin. Jesus is our Savior.

I played a game with my preschool class called Hide the Cross. It was a hide and seek game where one child hid the cross and the rest of the class found it. If I had just played the game with the kids without talking about why we were using a cross, we would have had fun, but I would have missed an opportunity to share the gospel with my class. Instead, I told them that we were using a cross because a cross helps us to remember that Jesus is our mighty Savior. Jesus is mighty; that means He is strong! Jesus is our Savior; that means that He died to save us from our sin. Jesus is our Mighty Savior!

4. Gospel-centered activities

There are many activities connected with Easter. Many of these activities do not focus on Jesus or the life-changing message of the gospel. Turn those activities into gospel-centered activities.

At Christmas, it is quite common to see Nativity sets in homes and at churches. Nativity Sets highlight the true meaning of Christmas and if they are child-friendly, allow children to interact with the story. Something similar can be done for Easter.

Make a diorama of the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection. There is a great deal to be learned by making the key characters with your children and using them to tell the story over Easter weekend. You may choose how many characters are necessary for your ministry based on your children’s ages and how detailed you want your re-enactment to be. You can create your characters and set with play dough, clay dough, cardboard, etc. A basic set would include Jesus, a cross, a couple of guards, a tomb with stone, and an angel. As you re-enact the story over the actual time frame of the weekend it makes children (and adults) more aware of the hours Jesus suffered and the days his followers waited in fear and confusion. It also highlights the wonderful surprise of the empty tomb.

If you are looking for a snack idea, try Resurrection Buns. Form some dough around a marshmallow. When baked, the marshmallow melts so there is a hollow space in the middle. As you enjoy these snacks with your children, talk about how they remind us of the empty tomb. The empty tomb shows that Jesus is a Mighty Savior! Follow this link for a recipe for Resurrection Buns.

If you choose to have an egg hunt, you could hide plastic eggs with verses or symbols of Easter within them and after they have been found, gather together to read or talk about the significance of each. A few of them could be left empty as well, as a reminder of the empty tomb. A few treats mixed in will also be appreciated.

There are many activities to offer children over Easter. Take the time to plan gospel-centered activities that will provide children with more than just a fun time.

 

Don’t miss the opportunity to share the gospel with kids this Easter! Give them something to celebrate! By being deliberate about sharing the gospel with kid this Easter you are making it all about Jesus, our Mighty Savior.

Christ died for sins once and for all time. The One who did what is right died for those who don’t do right. He died to bring you to God. His body was put to death. But the Holy Spirit brought Him back to life. (1 Peter 3:18 NIrV)

Here is a saying that you can trust. It should be accepted completely. Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. (1 Timothy 1:15 NIrV)

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