5 Qualities of Good Kidmin Volunteer Training

Volunteer TrainingHave you ever gotten home from a training event and thought, “That was so good! It was fun and practical and encouraging! I can make use of what I learned right away.”

That was a good training session! Here are 5 qualities of a good kidmin volunteer training session.

1. Relevant

A good kidmin volunteer training event will include information and ideas that are relevant to each individual that attends. This is not always easy to do, but it’s so important. Oftentimes, there are entire groups of volunteers who are left out during training sessions. If you invite everyone, make sure the training is relevant to everyone. Include information and ideas for all of your volunteers.

2. Applicable/Actionable

A good training event is one where each attendee knows how to apply what they have learned. Not only that, but each attendee comes away with an action plan for using the new information. Everyone who attends should have at least one practical idea that they can implement within a couple of weeks of the training event.

3. Engaging and Fun!

Volunteer training should be fun! Enjoy being together and learning together. Plan fun games and activities. It is really important that volunteers are engaged during training sessions. It is more likely that your volunteers will be engaged when the information is relevant.

4. Digestible Within the Time You Have

Don’t try to teach more than can be reasonably understood in the time you have for training. This is an issue that I struggle with all the time. I try and cram too much into a training session. I need to accept my own advice – teach one thing! Plan your training event with a specific topic in mind. Allow time during the training for your volunteers to digest the new information; to ask questions; and to practice any news skills taught.

5. Inspiring/Positive

Be positive! Good kidmin volunteer training includes encouragement! Volunteers should be inspired to continue through tough times because they are working towards a higher goal – kids who are growing disciples!

Kidmin volunteers deserve quality training that is relevant, applicable, engaging, fun, digestible within the time allotted, and inspiring. As you plan for your next volunteer training, remember these qualities and you will end up with a great volunteer training event!

Leading Kids in Worship

Girl twins  with arms raised.I love worship times with kids! It is such a privilege to lead kids in worship and to worship together with kids. But like any Children’s Ministry activity there needs to be a goal. Do you have a goal in mind when you lead kids in worship? I believe that the goal during worship time with kids should be to stir reverence and evoke worship.

Stir Reverence

Reverence is an attitude of deep respect tinged with awe. Another way of saying it would be to excite adoration.

The best way to do this is to focus on God. Focus on big truths about God. Highlight God’s goodness, faithfulness, love, holiness, awesomeness. Show kids that the God we love and serve is a big God worthy of our love and worship. Focusing on who God is allows for response.

But I, by your great love, can come into your house; in reverence I bow down toward your holy temple. Psalm 5:7

 

Therefore, since we are receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us be thankful, and so worship God acceptably with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire. Hebrews 12:28-29

 

Evoke Worship

Evoke means to call up. Humans are worshipers. If we are not worshiping God, we will be worshiping something else. To evoke worship then is to call up worth. To worship is to ascribe worth.

Lord, you are my God; I will exalt you and praise your name, for in perfect faithfulness you have done wonderful things, things planned long ago. Isaiah 25:1

 

How to Reach Your Goal

Since true worship is a matter of the heart, we can’t know what is going on in the minds and hearts of the kids we are leading in worship. But we can teach them what worship is and guide them toward moments of worship.

Directing kids to focus on God alone leads them toward worship. Plan every part of your worship time with the goal of directing kids to focus on God alone.

When we are confronted with who God is, our response is reverence, awe, and worship

Give praise to the Lord, proclaim his name; make known among the nations what he has done. Sing to him, sing praise to him; tell of all his wonderful acts. Glory in his holy name; let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice. Psalm 105:1-3

 

Teaching Tip – Pray as you Prep!

A young woman praying with her hands together on white backgroun

How much of your lesson prep is spent in prayer? Prayer should be a huge part of lesson prep.It is all to easy to get focused on the details of making sure you have all the materials needed and forget to pray that God would continue to transform you and the students in your class.

Ask God to do a work in your own heart.

It is all too easy to Sunday School teachers to fall into the pattern of reading quickly through an all-too-familiar Bible story and not spending time meditating on the truth of God’s Word. All Scripture is useful says 2 Timothy 3:16. When you pray, ask God to show you something new. Ask God to open your mind and your heart to understand His Word. From your learning and growth comes something to teach the kids in your class.

Pray also for your students that God would be preparing them to learn the Bible truth.

Pray for the specific needs of your students throughout the week. As you are preparing for the lesson, pray that your students would ready to hear the lesson. Ask God to put situations and experiences into their week that would prepare them to hear and understand the Bible truth you will teach on Sunday.

Make prayer a significant part of your preparation routine when you teach Sunday School.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:6-7

 

Robert Munsch 17:17 – Teaching Bible Skills – The Reference

“At bedtime I was sharing with Nicholas about what true friendship is. I ended by saying: “The bible says that a friend loves at all times!” Nicholas exclaimed “I know, Robert Munsch 17:17!” “What?” I asked for clarification. He explained “Robert Munsch 17:17! That’s the bible verse that says that a friend loves at all times.” Later I checked. Sure enough, the verse is found in Proverbs 17:17. Or as the cool kids call it Robert Munsch 17:17.”

To a 5 year old, Robert Munsch 17:17 makes just about as much sense as Proverbs 17:17. The books of the Bible are for the most part unfamiliar words for kids – Leviticus, Obadiah, Ecclesiastes, Thessalonians, and Philemon are just a few examples. The books of the Bible are just one part of the reference though.

Bible SkillsThe reference itself is an unfamiliar concept for kids. The Bible is the only book that is set up with books, chapters, and verses and the Bible is the only book that uses references as a means of locating information within a book.

When teaching Bible skills, one of your biggest jobs is to take what is unfamiliar and make it familiar.

Start With What Kids are Familiar With

Start with what kids are familiar with – chapter books. Kids understand that a book has a name and chapters. Show kids a chapter book and ask them to show you the title of the book and a chapter in the book. During this activity, ask the children to tell you what a book is and what a chapter is.

Once it is clear that all of the students understand what a book and a chapter is, show them a Bible. Ask them how the Bible is different from the chapter book you showed them (it is a library of books).

A Library of Books!

The first step to understanding a reference is to understand that the Bible is one book and a library of books! The Bible is one book that holds 66 different books. That is a lot! With so many books in one place, there needs to be a way to organize everything so that information can be found.

Each of the books in the Bible has its own name. Ask your students to show you a book in the Bible. Most Bibles have an introductory page for each book (this may be the page a student shows you). This introductory page is one of the ways the Bible is organized. Each book also has the name at the top of the page for each page in the book (some students may show you a page within the book with the title at the top).

Give kids lots of opportunities to practice finding books in the Bible. Remind them often that if they are lost, they can check the top of the page to find what book they are currently in.

The Chapter

Each book is divided into chapters. Show your students the chapter book again. In chapter books, the chapter is given a title and/or a number. Tell them that the way the Bible is organized; chapters are given numbers, starting with one. Ask your students to turn to a book in the Bible (different books are encouraged for this activity). Ask them to flip through the book to find out how many chapters are in that book. Some books of the Bible are short with only one chapter; others are very long with over 100 chapters (like the book of Psalms). Ask them to tell how to tell a chapter in the book (each chapter is given a big number).

The Verse

The Bible is a library of books that are divided into chapters. Those chapters are further divided into verses. A verse is designated by a small number at the beginning of the verse. Ask your students to find the book of Genesis chapter one. Once all of your students have found Genesis chapter one, ask them to show you verse 1. This is trickier than it sounds because not all Bibles show the number 1 for the first verse in a chapter (this could be because the chapter number is there also). Once your class has identified the first verse in chapter one, ask them to find verses 2-10. Ask, “Are the verse numbers always at the outer edge of the page/column?” (no, they are scattered throughout the text).

Ask the students to find a specific verse and read it. Then, ask the students to find a group of verses (ex. Verses 3-5) and read them out loud. I remember one student in grade four who was asked to read a short passage of Scripture. She read the verse number along with the text. Don’t forget that it’s our job to teach our students what a verse is, what its purpose is, and whether or not the verse number is read along with the text.

The Reference

Now students are ready to put it all together and learn what a reference is. One good way to explain a reference is to call it an address. The address tells us where a specific piece of information lives in the Bible. The address will tell us what book the information is in; what chapter the information is in once we have reached the book; and what verse the information is in once we have found the chapter within the book.

Write out a reference for your students:

John 1:1

When explaining the reference (book, chapter, verse), don’t forget to tell your students what the colon is for. The colon separates the chapter from the verse.

When students are familiar with a reference and comfortable using and writing them, it’s time to move on to more complex references.

1 John 1:1

In this reference there is an additional number at the beginning of the reference. Teach your students that certain books of the Bible have these numbers in them. When they see a book like that (1 Kings, 2 Timothy, etc) it is read “first” rather than “one” or “second” rather than “two” or “third” rather than “three”

John 1:1a

In this reference there is a letter at the end of the reference. Tell your students that because it comes after the colon it is related to the verse. Verses can be divided up into the first part of the verse and the last part of the verse. When they are just supposed to read the first part of the verse, an “a” will be added to the verse in a reference. When they are supposed to read only the last part of a verse, a “b” will be added to the verse in the reference.

Give your students lots of opportunity to practice this. The use of letters in a reference is not a clear cut skill. Verses are never divided exactly into half. Students need practice to see how a verse could be divided and what the person who wrote the reference what asking them to focus on.

John 1:1a could be “In the beginning was the Word.”

John 1:1b could be “and the Word was God,” or “the Word was with God, and the Word was God.”

John 1:1, 14

This reference contains two verses. It could also be written like this – John 1:1&14. The “and” and the comma perform the same function. They show the reader that only verse one and verse fourteen are to be read. Tell your students that when they see a comma they should think ‘and.’ In this case, verses one and fourteen. Let your students practice this new skill as well. Give them a variety of references with commas to look up.

John 1:1-14

This reference contains a dash. Tell your students that when they see a dash that means to read all the verses between the verses shown (make sure you let them know that it includes the verses shown as well!) So, in our example, students would read verses 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13, and 14.

John 1:1-14, 17

This reference contains a combination of the comma and the dash. Ask your students if they can tell you what it means. They would read verses one though fourteen and then verse seventeen.

Practice until Familiarity is Developed

I would not recommend doing all these activities in the same sitting. There are a lot of skills being taught here. Rather, let the students practice one skill at a time. When they are comfortable and familiar with that aspect of the reference, then it’s time to move on to the next activity.

Even when your students are ready to move on to a more complex reference, they still can benefit from practicing the skills they are learnt already.

Teach your students what a reference is and how it can be used to find specific information in the Bible. Never assume your class knows what a reference is not matter how old they are. Children in grade 5 may not understand correctly how a reference is designed or used if they have never been taught.

5 Reasons Why I’m Fine with Kids Bringing Their Cell Phones to Sunday School

I was recently asked this question on twitter …

It’s a very good question and one I had to think about for a while. The answer I came up with was that the most innovative thing I have seen recently in Children’s Ministry is kids bringing cell phones to Sunday School.mobiles for kids

The more I thought about this new aspect of Children’s Ministry, the more I realized that we as leaders and volunteers aren’t really prepared for this innovation.

We may be resistant to this change because we don’t want kids fooling around on their phones during class, we want kids to learn good Bible skills, and some may feel that kids are spending too much time with their phones and disengaging from face to face interaction.

So, here are 5 reasons why I’m okay with kids bringing their cell phones to Sunday School.

1. The Bible is Now Available on Mobile Devices.

We want kids reading and studying their Bibles in Sunday School. For some kids, this means using their mobile device. And that’s okay! Not all kids will have access to the Bible on their mobile device. In those cases, the phones need to be powered off and put away. But kids who have access to the Bible on their cell phone need to be encouraged to use it. Granted, we need to teach our kids a new set of rules for cell phone use in the classroom (for example, resisting the temptation to check social media sites!) The Bible is God’s Word and useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting, and training in righteousness (2 Timothy 3:16-17) whatever format it is found in!

2. Mobile Devices Offer Quick Access to Bible Study Helps.

Kids who bring their cell phones to Sunday School have the potential to access Bible study helps like online concordances or dictionaries, maps, and atlases. What a great potential for learning and discovery! Not all classrooms have hardcopies of concordances or Bible dictionaries. With mobile devices, kids can discover for themselves the meaning of a word or access a map of Bible lands to see just what a journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem would have entailed.

3. Mobile Device Users Can Schedule Bible Reading and Reminders to Apply Biblical Truth to Everyday Life.

One great thing about mobile devices is the ability to schedule reminders. Kids can compartmentalize things. They sometimes have a hard time applying what they have learned in Sunday School with the challenges they face during the week. Mobile phones can help to solve this with scheduled reminders. During class, encourage the kids to schedule a reminder to read their Bibles throughout the week and during application time, have them write their practical idea for applying Bible truth into their phones and carry it with them throughout the week.

4. Users Have Access to Online Devotionals.

In Sunday School, we are teaching our kids how to read and study their Bibles. We should also be encouraging them to read their Bibles throughout the week. We should also encourage them to find a good devotional book to use along with their Bible reading. A good devotional will help kids study and apply the Bible. Kids with cell phones can access online devotionals so teachers need to do some research so they can provide kids with good online devotional options.

5. Kids Are More Likely to Carry their Cell Phones to School than their Bibles.

Kids take their cell phones to school. If they have access to the Bible on their phones and have made notes about the practical way they are going to apply what they learned in Sunday School, then those phones have become a means for kids to grow as followers of Christ.

 

People are now reading the Bible on their mobile devices and that includes kids in our Sunday Schools. At first it can seem like kids are spending more time on their mobile devices than in their Bibles. However, this technological innovation gives kids the opportunity to access their Bible and more in ways they might not have before. Children’s Ministry leaders need to embrace the change and teach kids to use their phones wisely as tools to help build their faith.

For some teaching tips and strategies about cell phones in the Sunday School classroom, check out my blog post “Cell Phones in Sunday School.”

 

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