5 Qualities of Good Kidmin Volunteer Training

Volunteer TrainingHave you ever gotten home from a training event and thought, “That was so good! It was fun and practical and encouraging! I can make use of what I learned right away.”

That was a good training session! Here are 5 qualities of a good kidmin volunteer training session.

1. Relevant

A good kidmin volunteer training event will include information and ideas that are relevant to each individual that attends. This is not always easy to do, but it’s so important. Oftentimes, there are entire groups of volunteers who are left out during training sessions. If you invite everyone, make sure the training is relevant to everyone. Include information and ideas for all of your volunteers.

2. Applicable/Actionable

A good training event is one where each attendee knows how to apply what they have learned. Not only that, but each attendee comes away with an action plan for using the new information. Everyone who attends should have at least one practical idea that they can implement within a couple of weeks of the training event.

3. Engaging and Fun!

Volunteer training should be fun! Enjoy being together and learning together. Plan fun games and activities. It is really important that volunteers are engaged during training sessions. It is more likely that your volunteers will be engaged when the information is relevant.

4. Digestible Within the Time You Have

Don’t try to teach more than can be reasonably understood in the time you have for training. This is an issue that I struggle with all the time. I try and cram too much into a training session. I need to accept my own advice – teach one thing! Plan your training event with a specific topic in mind. Allow time during the training for your volunteers to digest the new information; to ask questions; and to practice any news skills taught.

5. Inspiring/Positive

Be positive! Good kidmin volunteer training includes encouragement! Volunteers should be inspired to continue through tough times because they are working towards a higher goal – kids who are growing disciples!

Kidmin volunteers deserve quality training that is relevant, applicable, engaging, fun, digestible within the time allotted, and inspiring. As you plan for your next volunteer training, remember these qualities and you will end up with a great volunteer training event!

Bright Ideas For Children’s Ministry

I was recently asked to contribute to a new book that was being released for Children’s Ministry leaders and volunteers. This book is full of tried and tested ideas for Children’s Ministry – Object Lessons, Crafts, Games, Leadership, Missions, Teaching Activities, Technology, and Worship.

50 ideas in one volume – that’s a resource that anyone would want!bright-ideas-cover-md

This book is available on kidology.org.

And even better – here’s a code to get $5 off if you buy the book before the end of the year – SAVE5JH

Check it out and consider adding it to your resource library!

 

Leading Kids in Worship

Girl twins  with arms raised.I love worship times with kids! It is such a privilege to lead kids in worship and to worship together with kids. But like any Children’s Ministry activity there needs to be a goal. Do you have a goal in mind when you lead kids in worship? I believe that the goal during worship time with kids should be to stir reverence and evoke worship.

Stir Reverence

Reverence is an attitude of deep respect tinged with awe. Another way of saying it would be to excite adoration.

The best way to do this is to focus on God. Focus on big truths about God. Highlight God’s goodness, faithfulness, love, holiness, awesomeness. Show kids that the God we love and serve is a big God worthy of our love and worship. Focusing on who God is allows for response.

But I, by your great love, can come into your house; in reverence I bow down toward your holy temple. Psalm 5:7

 

Therefore, since we are receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us be thankful, and so worship God acceptably with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire. Hebrews 12:28-29

 

Evoke Worship

Evoke means to call up. Humans are worshipers. If we are not worshiping God, we will be worshiping something else. To evoke worship then is to call up worth. To worship is to ascribe worth.

Lord, you are my God; I will exalt you and praise your name, for in perfect faithfulness you have done wonderful things, things planned long ago. Isaiah 25:1

 

How to Reach Your Goal

Since true worship is a matter of the heart, we can’t know what is going on in the minds and hearts of the kids we are leading in worship. But we can teach them what worship is and guide them toward moments of worship.

Directing kids to focus on God alone leads them toward worship. Plan every part of your worship time with the goal of directing kids to focus on God alone.

When we are confronted with who God is, our response is reverence, awe, and worship

Give praise to the Lord, proclaim his name; make known among the nations what he has done. Sing to him, sing praise to him; tell of all his wonderful acts. Glory in his holy name; let the hearts of those who seek the Lord rejoice. Psalm 105:1-3

 

Teaching Tip – Pray as you Prep!

A young woman praying with her hands together on white backgroun

How much of your lesson prep is spent in prayer? Prayer should be a huge part of lesson prep.It is all to easy to get focused on the details of making sure you have all the materials needed and forget to pray that God would continue to transform you and the students in your class.

Ask God to do a work in your own heart.

It is all too easy to Sunday School teachers to fall into the pattern of reading quickly through an all-too-familiar Bible story and not spending time meditating on the truth of God’s Word. All Scripture is useful says 2 Timothy 3:16. When you pray, ask God to show you something new. Ask God to open your mind and your heart to understand His Word. From your learning and growth comes something to teach the kids in your class.

Pray also for your students that God would be preparing them to learn the Bible truth.

Pray for the specific needs of your students throughout the week. As you are preparing for the lesson, pray that your students would ready to hear the lesson. Ask God to put situations and experiences into their week that would prepare them to hear and understand the Bible truth you will teach on Sunday.

Make prayer a significant part of your preparation routine when you teach Sunday School.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:6-7

 

6 Tips for Dealing with Discipline

behave yourself! - teacher1. Be consistent but handle each case individually.

By this I mean that it’s important to learn the circumstances of the situation as you discipline. Despite how you might feel in the heat of the moment, most children aren’t acting out just to make your day more difficult! Children are responsible for their actions and need to accept the consequences, but it is your job to find out what lead to the outburst. Discipline is not about punishment; it’s about discipleship. The child may have heavy things going on at home or be dealing with difficult situations at school. Take the time to talk with the child and give them ways of dealing with their feelings that are acceptable.

2. Always handle discipline in private.

Don’t embarrass the child by reprimanding them in front of the other kids.

This doesn’t mean being alone with the child. It means showing respect by speaking with the child off to the side and not in front of the other kids.

3. Discipline out of love, not anger.

If you are angry, give yourself a time out before you deal with the issue. Discipline that is handled in the heat of the moment when you are not in control of your emotions is not true discipline. If you are angry, you are not in a position to offer a child effective discipline. Remember, it’s not punishment, but discipline.

When you discipline out of love, rather than anger, you are training in a way that will mold character, behavior, and values.

4. Make sure the child understands why they are being disciplined.

Most children know exactly what they did! However, there are times when kids don’t know what they did that was wrong. They may be so focused on one thing that they do not realize that their actions resulted in hurt bodies or hurt feelings. When you discipline a child, ask them if they can tell what they did that was wrong. Remember, you are training to mold character and behavior.

5. Give kids a chance to make things right.

Part of the discipline process should be the opportunity to apologize. If a child has hurt another child, they should be encouraged to apologize. If a child has stolen an item they should be encouraged to return it. Whenever possible, give kids the chance to apologize and make things right. In your discussion, talk about how and when they might make things right with the person they have wronged.

6. Always welcome them back to the group.

Children need to know that we love them and care for them no matter what. This doesn’t mean that we ignore issues that arise. It means that we deal with them and then move on. Welcome the child who has been disciplined back to the group.

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