Top 10 Yancy Songs

It can be hard to find good music for kids – especially when you are looking for music to use on Sunday morning. A lot of songs are just silly or are too vague and symbolic for kids.

But there is good music out there – songs that kids can understand; songs that teach kids something about God; songs that lead kids to worship.

One of the places to find music for kids is www.yancynotnancy.com. Yancy is a musician and worship leader. Her music is geared for preteen children, but some of it can be used with all kids on Sunday mornings. Yancy is fun and upbeat.

I picked 10 songs that are great for Sunday morning. I will list the songs and why I picked them.

Here are my top 10 picks from Yancy:

1. The Greatest Gift

This is a Christmas song, but I love it so I thought I would include it anyway. It’s important to find good Christmas music for kids as well as music for the rest of the year. This song tells the story of Jesus’ birth and focuses on the fact that He the Son of God sent to save us. It’s an upbeat, joyful song that focuses on the true reason we celebrate at Christmas.

2. For Your Glory

This song is a high energy song that proclaims the desire to live for the glory of God. It talks about how God is great and good and gives us the strength to live the way He wants us to live. It is a song of worship and commitment to live our lives for the glory of God.

3. All of Me

This song is a slower song of worship sung as a prayer.The chorus says,

“I love You. And I want to serve You and give You all of me.”

This is a great song to use with kids in teaching about worship – this song is about Jesus and our love for Him.

4. I Will Worship You

This is a slow, worshipful song that tells of our love for Jesus and desire to worship Him for His faithfulness, for being wonderful and true. This is a good song to sing with kids because it is clear and simple. It is a song of worship to God that encourages kids to sing to Him in praise.

5. Shout!

“I want to shout it out that I love Jesus! Tell the world that God is good. Sing a song that makes me happy. Shout out loud that God is good.”

The chorus is great. The verses may need a little discussion, depending on the age of your kids. This song is upbeat and fun.

6. I’m Really Happy

This is an upbeat song that is great fun. This song talks about the joy we have as followers of Jesus. This is an unapologetic kid’s song – there is shouting and jumping and fun. I like this song because it highlights the happiness found in a relationship with Jesus.

7. Every Good and Perfect Thing

This is a fun, upbeat song of thanks to our God who is always good to us.

“You are good to me all the time You guarantee. You are good to me always. No matter what is to come; when life is perfect or coming undone. You are good to me always. Every good and perfect thing comes from You.”

This is a wonderful song to sing with kids because it reminds to be thankful for all the good things God gives us. It also reminds us that God is good all the time.

8. I Love You

This is a slow song of praise. The chorus says,

“I love You. With all of my heart I love You. With all of my life I love You. With all of my dreams I love You.”

There is only 1 verse and the chorus, so it is not difficult to learn. But there are a few phrases that will need explaining especially for younger children. During the verse:

“I don’t wanna be another voice ashamed to say Your name. Jesus, You are so much greater and my life will speak Your fame.”

The way the sentence is formed may cause some confusion and there are some words that should be defined (ashamed and the phrase “life will speak Your fame.”) It’s worth taking the time to talk about the meaning of this song and then singing it together with your kids.

9. Sing Your Praises Out

In Luke chapter 19, Jesus rides into Jerusalem to the praise of the crowd. The Pharisees tell Jesus to ask His disciples to be quiet.

“I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.”

This is an upbeat song of praise to our God who is big and worthy. I really like this song. It encourages those listening to sing His praises out because this is what we were made for.

10. Be Glorified

This is a slow song sung as a prayer. The chorus says,

“Jesus, be glorified. Jesus, be lifted high in my life, in my heart.”

I like how the word glorified is explained in the next sentence as being lifted high. Glorify is a word that needs to be explained to kids and, although, we may notice the definition given, kids may not. Make the connection for them. In this song we worship God by giving God the glory He alone deserves. We worship God for his glory and exalted status.

Teacher Training – Understanding Biblical Doctrine

childrens ministry: teaching biblical doctrine

Redemption, Sanctification, Atonement, Forgiveness, Sin, Justification – These are big words that a lot of adults have difficulty understanding. I believe that it is important to teach our children these truths. In order to teach them, we must first understand them ourselves.

“It takes as much or more understanding of a biblical doctrine to teach it to children than it does to teach it do adults. If you understand a thing well, you can usually make it plain for ordinary people and children. But if you are fuzzy in your own understanding, you will generally be overly complex in your explanation.” (John Piper)

I have seen the truth of this statement in classrooms that I have observed. Teachers who don’t fully understand the concept they are teaching end up being overly complicated and lengthy in their explanations.

This is one of the reasons why teachers should be encouraged to prepare for their Sunday School lessons early in the week. Doing so gives them a chance to fully understand a concept they will be teaching on Sunday morning. It also gives them the opportunity to come up with and prepare for illustrations and activities that will help to explain the doctrine or concept.

There are resources available for teachers who are interested in learning about Biblical doctrine. Watch for adult Sunday school classes or Bible studies on this subject at your church. There are some good books also that help teach Biblical doctrine. Consider making a good systematic theology book available to your teachers. One book I highly recommend is called, “Big Truths for Young Hearts,” by Bruce Ware. This book was written by a theology professor. The purpose is to help adults teach children Biblical doctrine. I have used this book a lot – it is helpful first for understanding a concept and second for teaching it to children.

Teachers who have taken the time to fully understand Biblical doctrine will be able to teach it well to their students.

Teaching Bible Skills – Finding books in the Bible

I believe that Bible skills are important. I believe that it is part of our job as children’s ministry volunteers, as Sunday School teachers to teach our kids Bible skills. This is the first in a series on teaching Bible skills. I hope you find it helpful.

Finding Books in the Bible

Our goal is to make disciples. Disciples of Jesus know their Bibles, love their Bibles, and read their Bibles. Becoming familiar with the layout of the Bible is an important part of this process. Knowing the books of the Bible and where they are to be found in the Bible is a skill our kids need to be taught.

Preschool

Preschool children either can’t read or are learning to read. Children of this age are eager to learn and we should not miss out on the opportunity to begin teaching them Bible skills.

In Sunday School, there are a number of different ways to begin to teach the skills of finding books in the Bible.

1. Encourage your class to bring their Bibles to Sunday School

This is the first step if you want to teach your class how to find books in the Bible. Preschool children may have an actual children’s Bible, or they may have a children’s storybook Bible. Either way, encourage them to bring it to Sunday School and then have them use it.

2. Look up the Bible passage for the story you will be teaching

Take a few moments at the beginning of story time and help the children find the story in their Bibles. First, tell the children what book of the Bible the story is in. In order to help them put it in context, also mention if it is the Old Testament or the New Testament. (“The Old Testament has the books at the front of the Bible. The New Testament has the books near the back of the Bible.”)

Children this age are learning their alphabet, learning to print their names, and learning to read. Once you have told them the book the story is in, encourage them to figure what letter of the alphabet the book starts with. Use that to help them find the book.  For example, the lesson is on Jesus feeding the 5000. Tell the children, “Our Bible story today is found in the book of Matthew. Matthew is the first book in the New Testament, so it is going to be found near the back of the Bible. What letter of the alphabet does Matthew start with? M. Look for the letter M at the top of the page.”

Most Bibles have the name of the book at the top of the page. Encourage children to look for their letter of the alphabet here. This exercise does take a few minutes, but I have noticed children are eager to use their emerging reading skills and show great pride when they have found the book. Once they have found it, point to the name of the book. Ask them to show you the first letter of the word. Then tell them, as in our example, “M is for Matthew.”

For children with storybook Bibles, help them find the story and then remind them what book of the Bible this story is found in. Some Bible storybooks have the reference for each story at the beginning. Show them the reference and make the connection to the book of the Bible.

Elementary

1. Encourage your kids to bring their Bibles to Sunday School

Tthis is so important. You may want to use incentives to encourage your kids to bring their Bibles. We want it to become a habit. A huge incentive for kids to bring their Bibles is when they actually use them. So, encourage your kids to bring their Bibles, and then make sure you have the kids use them in class.

2. Have extra Bibles available

Have a few age-appropriate Bibles ready for visitors or kids who don’t have a Bible or who forgot to bring theirs.

3. Plan to have the class look up at least one Bible verse or passage during Sunday School

Having the class look up a Bible passage takes time – usually more time than you expected! So, always plan out what you are going to have the kids look up. For younger kids, it is best to have the class look up the same passage. As the kids get older and more familiar with their Bibles and better at reading, you can have the kids look up different passages. Give the reference and then encourage the kids to help each other and to share discoveries. As the kids are looking up the reference, talk about whether it is in the Old Testament or the New Testament; whether it is before or after particular books. These questions help the kids to consider context.

4. Make use of the table of contents

Teach your kids how to use the table of contents in the front of their Bibles. The table of contents is a great tool. It shows how books are divided into old and new testaments. Show the kids how to find a book in the table of contents and then to use the page number given to find the book in the Bible. Help the children to understand that different Bibles will have different page numbers.

5. Plan games or activities that will give the kids a chance to develop their skills in finding books in the Bible.

Bible drills – Bible drills are a great activity. They are a fun way for kids to get to know their Bibles and to become familiar with how the books are ordered in the Bible. The rules of a Bible drill are simple. Children will hold their Bibles up above their heads. You will say a Bible reference. Ask the children to repeat it and then say, “go.” The children will lower their Bibles and look up the reference. Once they have found it, they should stand up.

Books of the bible games – There are many different game ideas that will help the children become familiar with the books of the Bible. In an upcoming post, I will give you some ideas for activities that kids will find fun and engaging and that will ultimately help them develop Bible skills.

6. Older Elementary children who have the Bible on their phones or tablets

You may have children in your classes, especially older children, who carry cell phones or other devices. They may choose to use these instead of a hard copy Bible. There is nothing wrong with looking up Bible references on these devices. Children may actually tell you that it is easier, because they just have to enter the search information. As teacher, you will have to institute some class rules for use of these devices in class. Although it is great that they have access to the Bible on these devices, they also have access to other programs as well that could cause a distraction or loss of attention in class. When you make rules about using devices in your classroom, include your class in the discussion.

 

Learning to find books in the Bible and becoming familiar with our Bibles is not an end in itself. It is part of the discipling process. Our goal is to make disciples. Disciples love Jesus! We get to know Jesus and how to follow Him through our Bibles. Teaching children to know and love their Bibles, then, is an important part of the disciple-making process. Teaching Bible skills will help our children get to know their Bibles and more importantly, get them reading their Bibles and getting to know God, who is the main character in the Bible.

4 Tips for Teaching a Multi-Age Class

Many Sunday School teachers have the responsibility of teaching one class with children of all ages. This is not an easy responsibility, but it can be done.

Here are 4 tips for teachers of multi-age classes:

1. Teach to the middle

For the Bible lesson portion of your Sunday School class, plan and teach for the middle of your age range. If your class is children in grades 1-6, then teach to the grade 3 level. The younger children may find the lesson a bit above their level and the older children may find it does not challenge them enough, but teaching to the middle is the best way to reach all the children in your class. No matter how big of an age gap you have between the kids in your class, teach to the middle of the age range. The other activities you plan will help bring it all together for the kids in your class.

2. Plan application & activities for specific ages

The application and other activities you plan for the Sunday School class will be where you can challenge each age group specifically and make sure that everyone understands the main point of the class.

Application – Split the kids into 2 or 3 age groups for the application time. Give the older kids an assignment that will help them to discover the application in a group. While they are busy, you can discuss the application with the younger kids. You may encourage each group to choose a presenter that will tell the whole group what they discovered during application time. When you have finished with the younger children, get them involved in an activity and then join the older children to find out what they have discovered and encourage them in the right direction if necessary.

Bible memory verse – The younger kids can be given a portion of the verse and the older kids can be challenged to memorize all of it. For example, the younger kids in your class can be given James 1:17a “Every good and perfect gift is from above,” and the older kids can be given the entire verse to memorize, “Every good and perfect gift is from above coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.”

Games & Crafts – Plan games and crafts that are appropriate for the different age groups. While the younger kids are working on a coloring picture or simple craft, the older kids can be working on a group assignment. Make sure all games and crafts that you plan are related to the lesson and specifically to the theme of the lesson.

3. Give the older kids responsibility

Giving the older kids some responsibility in your class will challenge them and help them to feel like vital parts of the Sunday School class.

There are many ways the older kids can help with the younger kids:

  • Ask them to sit with the younger kids during the Bible lesson. The big kids can be an example for the younger children of expected behavior.
  • The older kids can also help the younger kids look up the Bible passage. If the younger kids have storybook Bibles, the older kids can help them find the story. Then the older kids can show the younger kids where it is found in their Bibles. This is especially helpful as not all Bible stories will be found in storybook Bibles.
  • Ask the older kids to read Bible passages out loud. Another idea is to have the older kids act out the Bible story.
  • The older kids could help lead a game or craft you have planned for the younger kids. They can also help the younger kids with the memory verse. Encourage them to explain the verse to the younger kids. This will help them in memorizing as well.

4. Teach 1 thing

I have written about teaching one thing before. It is just as important to teach one thing in a mulit-age class as it is in a single-age classroom.

As you are teaching your multi-age class, find different ways to state your theme that will relate to the different age groups.

For example, your theme is “God is the sovereign ruler of all.” The Bible lesson, activities, and memory verse all support and highlight this theme. Repeat it often. If you have preschoolers in your class you could say, “God is the boss,” or “God is the King of everything.” For children in grades 1-3 you could say, “God is sovereign – that means He is in charge of everything. No one is His boss.”

By restating in a few times, you are making sure that all age groups understand and you are explaining the meaning of difficult or new words. All the kids in your class will benefit from that.

 

It is not easy to teach a class with children of all different ages. As a teacher, you want to make sure that all the children in your class are engaged, learning, and being challenged. These tips should help you as you seek to teach children of any age.

1 41 42 43 44 45 48